Social Security Disability Insurance is often difficult to obtain, and it appears it may become even more so if a proposed new rule moves forward. The current presidential administration has proposed a new rule that, if passed, would impact about half of all people who apply for disability benefits. It would also narrow the eligibility criteria for obtaining SSDI benefits, potentially making it even more difficult for Americans to obtain them than it already is.

According to ThinkAdvisor, right now, fewer than four out of every 10 people who apply for SSDI benefits ultimately receive them. This figure may go down even further if the proposed rule winds up taking effect, which would change the way the U.S. Social Security Administration would consider age, education and work when determining SSDI recipients.

More specifically, the proposed rule would require applicants to be at least 55 years of age, rather than 50, before the administration would factor in education and work experience when assessing benefits eligibility. It would also eliminate a previously held assumption that age has the capacity to seriously hinder an individual’s ability to perform basic, entry-level tasks.

Opponents to the proposed rule change believe that it would unnecessarily challenge some of America’s most vulnerable citizens and that it could particularly hinder older adults who may have limited education or employment skills. Once the rule is in final form, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget is going to have an opportunity to review and revise it before it would move forward. Find out more about SSDI benefits and Supplemental Security Insurance on our webpage.